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legal black holeU.S. Army, U.S. military, private contractors, Pentagon, justice, US Department of Defense, sexual assaults, Iraq, Afghanistan, Military Extraterritorial Jurisdiction Act, MEJA, rape, KBR, Halliburton, CACI International Inc, J.P. Jack London,interrogation, Iraqi, scandal, abuse

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legal black hole, were no justice escapes

In 2008 the US Department of Defense reported a total of 742 sexual assaults against both soldiers and civilians in Iraq and Afghanistan(1 ).

The Department of Defense says the military justice system didn't apply to civilians. They say civilian offender should be prosecuted by the by the US Justice Department under a law that passed in 2000(2 ).

The law is called the Military Extraterritorial Jurisdiction Act (MEJA). This law gives the Justice Department jurisdiction over contractors who's job is "supporting the mission of the Department of Defense overseas.". It's rarely used and its never been used to prosecute rape (3 ).

While working for a foreign contractor, a women said she was sodomized and forced to perform oral sex on a soldier and coworker. She worked for Service Employees International Inc a foreign subsidiary of KBR/Halliburton at Camp Harper near Basra, Iraq. Another women who spoke before a House of Representatives committee that she had been raped KBR/Halliburton co-workers in 2005, said "It bothers me that it happened again after I stood up and brought awareness to it and brought KBR to such scrutiny," (4 ).

A rarity the MEJA was used to charge and prosecute five Blackwater guards in the shooting deaths Iraqi in Nisur Square in 2007(5 ). See Blacke water section.

U.S. Army, U.S. military, private contractors, Pentagon, justice, US Department of Defense, sexual assaults, Iraq, Afghanistan, Military Extraterritorial Jurisdiction Act, MEJA, rape, KBR, Halliburton, CACI International Inc, J.P. Jack London,interrogation, Iraqi, scandal, abuse