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EnronGOP, Corruption, Kenneth Lay, Bush-Cheney, Enron, Arthur Andersen, Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, George Bush, Kuwait, Clinton, WorldCom, Long Distance Discount Services, LDDS, scandal

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Kenneth Lay lead Enron from a natural gas company that was formed in 1985 to a conglomerate that reached number 7 on Fortune's 500 in 2000, it also claimed $101 billion in annual revenues (1 ).

Kenneth Lay was born in Tyrone, Missouri, in 1942. He was the son of a preacher who was also a part time salesman of stoves and tractors. As child he helped his family meet ends by cutting grass and delivering newspapers. He was also one of Bush-Cheney biggest donors (2 ).

Enron had high level contacts. Enron executive Kenneth Lay interviewed people for White house appointments. Curtis Hebert former chairman of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission said he was interview by Mr. Lay about the position. Others where also interviewed by Mr. Lay for the position (3 ).

When George Bush Sr took a tour of his victory in the Gulf War 1993. Enron paid for members of Bush's entourage like former State James Baker and Gulf War Lieutenant General Thomas Kelly, to lobby Kuwait for contracts to replace its destroyed power plants. Enron wasn't just liked by the GOP. Members of Clinton's staff including National Security Advisor Anthony Lake threatened to cut off US aid to Mozambique if they did not give Enron a pipeline contract (4 ).

Enron used erroneous bookkeeping, their auditor, Arthur Andersen, knew all about there off the balance sheets partnerships. Arthur Andersen was paid 5.7 million to advise them about them. They also had to know about the illusionary profits Enron claimed because they signed off on them. In 2000 along Andersen experts where paid 25 million to understand Enron's finances (5 ).

There was also insider trading Enron executives cashed in their stock for 1 billion in profits. The employees lost there jobs and retirement saving, this doesn't include the loss of the investors (6 ).

GOP, Corruption, Kenneth Lay, Bush-Cheney, Enron, Arthur Andersen, Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, George Bush, Kuwait, Clinton, WorldCom, Long Distance Discount Services, LDDS, scandal