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EugenicsEugenics, utopian, procreation, breeding, marriage, Oneia, John Humphrey Noyes, George Reid, American Eugenics Society, Eugenics, religion, race, religious, Christ, Jesuit, Human Betterment Foundation, Rabbi, sterilization

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There were charities formed by religious leaders, social workers, journalist and academics, there goal was a "New Philanthropy". Organizations, such as National Conference of Charities and Correction promoted scientific philanthropy. In 1899 Rev. A. O. Wright secretary of the Wisconsin State Board of Charities. Warned of "knots of defective classes" of people who had produced "a whole population of criminals, paupers, idiots and lunatics.". As the president of the National Conference of Charities and Correction, offered a new vision of philanthropy that would send those defective classes" to state-sponsored colonies, "Unless we are prepared for drastic measures of wholesale death or equally wholesale castration," he added "we must cut off defective heredity by the more expensive but more humane method of wholesale imprisonment."(1 ).

Historian Edward J. Larson found scattered opposition to eugenics in state legislative records from mostly Protestants in the south. But the evangelical mainstream at the turn at the start of 1900's appeared to be apathetic, acquiescent, or at times downright supportive to eugenics (2 ).

The Woman's Christian Temperance Union (WCTU) became one of the largest women's movement during the Victorian era, numbering 200,000 members by 1892, in 1921 they numbered 344,000. Banning alcohol was only part of there Activities. The National Purity Evangelist for the WCTU, was supportive of the Eugenics movement (3 ).

Indeed, eugenics was a priority of many un the temperance movement Irving Fisher a Yale economist who supported prohibition an eugenic as illustrated in hit book "How to Live: Rules for Healthful Living Based on Modern Science," (4 )

The General Director, Charles Scanlon of the Department of Moral Welfare of the Presbyterian Church in the USA wrote in its 1925 Annual report "Social hygiene, protecting the very fountains of life and fostering wholesome eugenics," and also wrote "Defectives and delinquents, caring for the unfortunate, restoring the erring and wayward."(5 ).

John Harvey Kellogg was a medical doctor, educator, theologian, health reformer, and inventor of the cornflakes. He was convinced that America was heading down the road to "race degeneration" because of a poor diet and its moral habits. He hosted three "Race Betterment Conferences." In 1914, 1915, 1928 (6 ).

Unitarian minister John Haynes Holmes and Reform Rabbi Stephen S. Wise, both of New York met through reform circles and became long standing friendship, and in 1910 they endorsed eugenics (7 ). Rev. John Haynes Holmes said about eugenics, "Nothing is more important, to my mind, in our modern treatment of the question of marriage, than to use our powers of social control to prevent many people from marrying-those, namely, whose marriage, for one reason or another, can be nothing but a tragedy."(8 ).

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Eugenics, utopian, procreation, breeding, marriage, Oneia, John Humphrey Noyes, George Reid, American Eugenics Society, Eugenics, religion, race, religious, Christ, Jesuit, Human Betterment Foundation, Rabbi, sterilization