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They Slew a dreamerbushes, Memphis Police Department, conspiracy, James Earl Ray, King, House Select Committee on Assassinations, triggerman, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr, evidence, Raoul

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The same bushes were cut down overnight Andrew Young agreed and said "Somebody gave an order in the middle of the night to go out and cut down that underbrush. So that when the sun came up on the 5th of April, the bushes were no longer there."(31 )".

A senior official in the Memphis Sanitation Department Maynard Stiles, said about at 7 am on April 5 (1968) he got a call from Memphis Police Department Inspector Sam Evans, he was "requiring assistance clearing brush and debris from a vacant lot near the site of the assassination. I called another superintendent of sanitation. He assembled a crew, went to the site, and cleaned up the site in a slow, methodical, meticulous manner under the direction of the police department." This is the Brushy area across from the Lorraine Motel(32).

opinions

"I have always believed that the government was part of a conspiracy, either directly or indirectly, to assassinate Dr Martin Luther King" stated Reverend Jesse Jackson.

Entertainer Dick Gregory has also had doubts as to the 'official version' of Kings Killing. He expressed his doubts in a book he co-authored (Murder in Memphis) with Mark Lane.

fallout

A 1977 House select committee to investigate the murder of King said they had ample evidence that James Earl Ray was the killer of King but they also believed he did not act alone The committee's Chief Counsel for Robert Blakey said in St Louis a group of racist business men offered a 50,000 dollar bounty on King. Blakey said the committee was able to tie the bounty offer to Ray or his family circumstantially(33).

Rep. Louis Stokes, D-Ohio, who from 1977 to 1979 served as chairman of the House Select Committee on Assassinations, which investigated the King and John F. Kennedy murders, says he can't answer all the questions, but that based on what he knows, he believes Ray committed the murder--but not alone. "I agreed with our committee's findings that James Earl Ray was the triggerman who assassinated Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Stokes said, "During our investigation, we uncovered facts that point to the conclusion that it is unlikely that James Earl Ray acted alone."(34).

Rep. Louis Stokes, also said "We found that there was substantial evidence to establish the existence of a St. Louis-based contract on the life of Dr. King," He said the committee felt Ray was the gunman but others were involved the person named `Raoul' was made up to cover for the people who really helped him(35).

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bushes, Memphis Police Department, conspiracy, James Earl Ray, King, House Select Committee on Assassinations, triggerman, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr, evidence, Raoul