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Scope and effectextraordinary rendition, torture, international law, arrest, Condoleezza Rice, Gonzalez, mistreatment, US, U.S., US Attorney General, terror, September 11 2001, Afghanistan, Dick Cheney, Colin Powell, Donald Rumsfeld, John Ashcroft, Geneva Conventions, FBI, CIA, World War II, war crimes

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Effect and effectiveness

Released FBI documents from the navel base at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Showed that some military intelligence officer wanted to use hasher interrogation than the FBI, one inspector complained, "every time the FBI established a rapport with a detainee, the military would step in and the detainee would stop being cooperative."(6 ).

An former intelligence official said that Abu Zubaydah the torture he endured did not release in any important information being released (7 ).

Ali Soufan a former interrogator for the FBI testified before Congress He labeled the harsh techniques as "slow, ineffective, unreliable, and harmful to our efforts.". In fact "one of the more significant pieces of intelligence information we've ever obtained in the war on terror." Was gained by normal interrogation (8 ).

The CIA used harsh interrogation techniques like waterboarding on Abu Zubaida. He did give information most of it was already known, and no terror plot was prevented due to the information given. His most useful was given before he was tortured (9 ).

It been disclosed that "upwards of 90 per cent" of interrogations achieve their goal by establishing a rapport with the person who is being interrogated VS the of use harsh techniques. Harsh techniques can also yield "unreliable information" (10 ).

Along with information of questionable accuracy gotten from harsh interrogation techniques a memo from the military's Joint Personnel Recovery Agency also cited another concern, it said "The unintended consequence of a U.S. policy that provides for the torture of prisoners is that it could be used by our adversaries as justification for the torture of captured U.S. personnel," (11 ).

Speaking on torture Professor Shane O'Mara of Trinity College, Dublin said that torture "is based on the assumption that subjects will be motivated to reveal truthful information to end interrogation, and that extreme stress, shock and anxiety do not impact on memory." and added "However this model of the impact of extreme stress on memory and the brain is utterly unsupported by scientific evidence.". A clinical psychologist from the University of East London Dr David Harper, said "Believers in coercive interrogation tend to believe that people will 'tell the truth' as a result but much evidence suggests that people will, in fact, tell those conducting the torture what they think will make the torture stop.". and not necessarily the truth (12 ).

One technique persecuted/defended

Waterboarding was use Japanese interrogators used while questioning prisoners, during World War II. Those who did this were tried and sent to prison for war crimes(13 ).

If the Japanese interrogators could have only had Dick Cheney decide their fate. The outcome could have been different, Cheney said in support of waterboarding prisoners "a dunk in water" is a "no-brainer" if it could save lives (14 ).

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extraordinary rendition, torture, international law, arrest, Condoleezza Rice, Gonzalez, mistreatment, US, U.S., US Attorney General, terror, September 11 2001, Afghanistan, Dick Cheney, Colin Powell, Donald Rumsfeld, John Ashcroft, Geneva Conventions, FBI, CIA, World War II, war crimes